In Mexico It's More

Movement for Change Coming from the Iguala Case

By Blanche Petrich

Cross-posted from Compañero Manuel

Orginally released Dec 9 2014

In Mexico It's More

(translation: In Mexico it’s more dangerous to be a student than a drug trafficker)

The five popular municipal committees that were installed yesterday in different Guerrero municipios, and another 20 more that are being prepared, are part of the people’s organized response, who beginning with the Iguala attack, were at a “point of no return, articulating a movement for changing things in this country, once and for all,” asserted Omar García, leader of the Student Committee of the Ayotzinapa Rural teachers college. He described these new organizational experiences in Ayutla de los Libres, Tlapa, Acapulco, San Luis Acatlán and Tecoanapa as initiatives “that seek to exercise self-government and direct democracy through popular assemblies,” which seek to change the forms of government where an official municipal (county) structure dominates that administers public and private issues. “We want it to be the population that attends to those issues with a concept of population, of people, with all its difficulties and complexities, with their creativity.”

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EZLN: On Ayotzinapa, the Festival, and Hysteria as Analysis

By Subcomandante Insurgente Moisés, Zapatista Army for National Liberation

Cross-posted from Enlace Zapatista

On Ayotzinapa, the Festival, and Hysteria as a Method of Analysis and Guide for Action

 

To the compas of the National and International Sixth:

To the National Indigenous Congress:

To the family members and compañeros of those killed and disappeared in Ayotzinapa:

Sisters and brothers:

Compañeros and compañeras:

There are many things we want to tell you. We won’t tell you all of them because we know right now there are more urgent and important issues for all of us.[i] Thus we ask for your patience and your attentive ear.

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Another Black Boy Gunned Down by Police

By Beverly Bell

We will never learn of the names, lives, and deaths of countless Black men and boys murdered by police – and slavery enforcers, hate groups, vigilantes, and a host of others – dating back to the earliest days of this country’s history. The names and stories of a slew of recent victims of extrajudicial executions, such as Eric Garner and Michael Brown, and the exoneration of their killers, have become widely known through the blowback of public fury.

This is a tale of another Black boy whose name and wrongful death were never reported in any official document or national media. The policeman responsible was not charged, indicted, or prosecuted. This child’s prematurely snuffed life was not spent in the US but in the Black nation of Haiti, though the US government subsidized his murderer.

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